December 2, 2022
Lessons In Love: 100 People Reveal 'red Flags' From Past Relationships To Help YOU Learn What To Avoid - From 'bad Tattoos' And 'shirtless Pictures On Dating Apps' To 'being ..

Lessons In Love: 100 People Reveal 'red Flags' From Past Relationships To Help YOU Learn What To Avoid - From 'bad Tattoos' And 'shirtless Pictures On Dating Apps' To 'being ..

Lessons In Love: 100 People Reveal ‘red Flags’ From Past Relationships To Help YOU Learn What To Avoid – From ‘bad Tattoos’ And ‘shirtless Pictures On Dating Apps’ To ‘being …

Lessons in love: 100 people reveal ‘red flags’ from past relationships to help YOU learn what to avoid – from ‘bad tattoos’ and ‘shirtless pictures on dating apps’ to ‘being rude to staff’

  • As apart of its ‘Keep it 100’ series, Cut.Com interviewed 100 people and asked them what they are weary of while dating
  • Cut.Com is a digital outlet that often shares ‘awkward’ moments through interviews, which are then posted to its YouTube channel
  • From having ‘no bed frame’ and gaslighting to pictures of men holding fish, they detailed the signs things may go downhill
  • Many were quick to point to basic red flags such as ‘prejudice’, ‘racism’, ‘ bad hygiene’, ‘disrespect’ and more specifically, being ‘rude to wait staff’
  • The video gave viewers a look into what many think of while dating, helping you either land a date or know when to run

The end of a romantic relationship often comes with many things: heartbreak, anger, even relief. But with the passing of a failed coupling always presents the opportunity to learn some lessons and reflect on the ‘red flags’ that you may have missed while in the midst of passion.

Now, 100 people are helping others to gain some invaluable knowledge about the do’s and don’ts of love – sharing the ‘red flags’ that they encountered in their own past relationships in an effort to guide other people on what to avoid.

As apart of its ‘Keep it 100’ series, Cut.Com – which is a digital outlet that ‘spreads stories for fun, for serious, and for real’ – interviewed 100 people and asked them what they are wary of while dating.

From having ‘no bed frame’ and gaslighting to pictures of men holding ‘fish’, they detailed the signs you’re relationship may be going downhill.

The interview begins with the simple, yet complex question, ‘What are your red flags in dating?’

As apart of its ‘Keep it 100’ series, Cut interviewed 100 people and asked them what they are weary of while dating

One man said he refused to date a woman ‘if she’s slept with my friends’, while others detailed even more red flags to watch out for

Others were quick to point to basic red flags such as ‘prejudice’, ‘racism’, ‘ bad hygiene’, ‘disrespect’ and more specifically, being ‘rude to wait staff’

‘Oh there’s just so many,’ responded one person.

Others were quick to point to basic red flags such as ‘prejudice’, ‘racism’, ‘ bad hygiene’, ‘disrespect’ and more specifically, being ‘rude to wait staff.’

And while many red flags seemed to be universal among the group, a couple did stand out from the crowd and offered up a few warning signs you would never think to look for.

‘No bed frame,’ said one woman.

While another claimed her red flag was ‘shirtless pictures of men on dating apps’, and one woman revealed she couldn’t stand pictures of men holding ‘fish.’

Other responses seemed to be more about personal preference than dating in general as one man said he would never date a woman ‘if she’s slept with my friends.

‘Long acrylics’, ‘fake eyelashes’,  ‘bad tattoos’ and ‘no sense of style’ seemed to be the most superficial red flags few in the group spewed out.

And while many red flags seemed to be universal among the group of people, one woman stood out from the crowd and revealed her red flag was when a man has ‘no bed frame’

Gaslighting was a common response among the group as it seemed as though many of them had experienced it for themselves

Another claimed her red flag was ‘shirtless pictures of men on dating apps’, and one woman revealed she couldn’t stand pictures of men holding ‘fish’

The group continued to try to warn viewers of red flags to watch out for while dating and noted that you should be weary of ‘moody’ people, those who ‘litter’ and ‘dishonest’ people

The group continued to try to warn viewers of red flags to watch out for while dating and noted that you should be weary of ‘moody’ people, those who ‘litter’, ‘dishonest’ people and those who ‘gaslight.’

Gaslighting was a common response among the group as it seemed as though many of them had experienced it for themselves.

Gaslighting is a form of manipulation used by abusers who are attempting to gain control by sowing self-doubt and confusion in the victim’s mind.

And while many of the red flags taught you what you should be on the look out for, they also revealed what you shouldn’t be doing while dating – including ‘not responding’ and being ‘dodgy’.

Other red flags the group warned of included people who are ‘full of themselves’, those who take things ‘too seriously’, ‘overly share’ and ‘clingy’ people.

When Cut turned the tables and questioned the group as to why they couldn’t land a date or stay in a relationship, they began to spew out their own red flags

From ‘overthinking’ and being ‘insecure’ to becoming ‘too angry’ and refusing to ‘commit’, many people detailed what they should be working on

The video gave viewers a look into what many think of while dating, helping you either land a date or know when to run

And unsurprisingly considering the group was interviewed just two prior to the midterm elections, many noted that political views play a large role in their dating life and they wouldn’t date anyone with differing beliefs, with most people adding that they wouldn’t date ‘conservatives.’

And while the group of 100 people spewed out plenty of responses for red flags found in others, when Cut turned the tables and questioned the group as to why they couldn’t land a date or stay in a relationship, they began to spill their own red flags.

From ‘overthinking’ and being ‘insecure’ to becoming ‘too angry’ and refusing to ‘commit’, many people detailed what they should be working on.

The video gave viewers a look into what many think of while dating, helping you either land a date or know when to run.

Advertisement

I Used My Phone And Tablet To Become An Artist – Here’s What Happened

Chances are, if you’re reading this, you or someone you know wants to learn how to create art, but you don’t have the supplies for it. However, you do have a phone. You might even have a tablet.

Is it possible to become an artist with just those tools? The short answer is a resounding “yes.” The longer answer is that I tried it and succeeded, but there were some issues I ran into along the way.

The devices I used for mobile artwork A phone shows the art program IbisPaint on screen.The IbisPaint program Elizabeth Tirk / Digital Trends

A majority of people — like myself — won’t have the best smartphone on the market. I use a Samsung Galaxy A53, a middle-of-the-road phone. It’s not made to produce art. I can tell you with all certainty that it didn’t make it easy either.

I also own an iPad; not an iPad Pro or anything built for artistry, just a regular ol’ iPad. I had always wanted to learn how to make art on a tablet — I’d even heard it’s how many professional artists do their work. My hopes were high. And I have to say, they’re really onto something.

It’s important that I also share I have made art for a great number of years. My medium has always been on the PC, and that experience didn’t really transfer to a touchscreen. I knew that. I went into this from the standpoint of someone trying to learn art solely on their phone and tablet. If anything, having past experience held me back in a few ways.

A great experience, with time and patience Drawing with the Apple Pencil on the iPad Pro (2022).Joe Maring/Digital Trends

The iPad sucked the hope out of me at first. Perhaps this won’t be the experience of everyone else starting out on a tablet, but I struggled with it for the first 10 or so hours. Doesn’t sound good, right? Don’t be dissuaded, it does get better. Much better.

I started drawing on the iPad with just my finger. The excitement to create was high, as were my hopes. I thought a touchscreen would make art really easy. I had the expectation that I’d suddenly create amazing work instantly. You can see where this is going, can’t you?

I felt frustrated by how slow and clumsily it felt to draw with my finger. I didn’t have precision. I tried pens with touchscreen tips. It was choppy. So I decided an Apple Pencil would surely fix this issue! Until I saw its price. If I’m already not going to dump money into art supplies, I don’t want to do the same over a tool for the iPad that I didn’t even know I would commit to yet.

Instead, I turned to Amazon and found myself a Meko stylus specifically made for sensitivity and precision. It was pretty cheap, and I can attest to it being absolutely worth the price. I had to get used to the strange way it laid on the screen first, but once I adjusted, it felt great — and it was even usable on my phone. You might be off-put by its style, so I’d highly suggest looking through the best styluses and finding one that’s the right fit for you.

An iPad shows art made with Procreate and a Meko Stylus.An attempt at backgrounds with a Meko stylus Elizabeth Tirk / Digital Trends

I moved over to trying art on my phone. The app Sketchbook made working with my finger really intuitive. Meanwhile, IbisPaint X only really flourished with a stylus. Both were free, which was a plus. Not only that, the screen of a phone is obviously smaller than a tablet. That was an issue I had, but surprisingly less than I thought it would be.

After a few weeks of hard practice, I definitely felt like I achieved artist status regardless of the problems I faced. They took time to overcome, but with that time, I learned how to make better work. I even found that I enjoyed drawing with a touchscreen! After all, I could do it anywhere. Watching a movie, on a car ride, or even in the airport. Having my art become mobile and easy to access made it immensely useful and easy to work on.

Where things went really wrong A phone is propped up on a table, showing an art program with a stylus.A failed attempt with a stylus Elizabeth Tirk / Digital Trends

Since the Galaxy A53 wasn’t made for art, it really doesn’t lend itself well to the cause. The touchscreen on it can be affected by any hard or soft objects. Any bumps or nudges from unrelated objects mess with the piece. It’s great for just using my hands to draw, but terrible for the Meko stylus I got. That’s really frustrating because I lacked the precision I need to make the art I want.

Sadly, another issue with using the phone is the screen size. As to be expected, it was too small. Not impossibly small, mind you (it’s really great for small art pieces or works without a lot of fine details). I love doodling on it in my spare time, but I would probably never make a complicated piece on there for my own sanity’s sake.

For the iPad, the thing that aggravated me so much was how much it lacked intuitive features. I struggled to import images, and I really struggled to export images. Many times, I outright gave up exporting my work and took a screenshot because I couldn’t be fussed to understand what was happening. Sometimes I avoided working on the iPad just because of how bad I felt about the software design.

How you can start creating art on the go A character is drawn on an iPad using Procreate.A character drawn in Procreate Elizabeth Tirk / Digital Trends

If you’re wanting to start your own journey with art on devices you already own, I definitely recommend trying with a tablet over a phone. A phone is good for doodling on, but it’s much more difficult to get into. With a tablet, you have the same free options as the phone, like Sketchbook or IbisPaint, but Procreate actually won me over. It does cost money, and sometimes it was confusing to use, but its brushes and options are unmatched. However, invest in some kind of stylus to save yourself the headache later.

Starting with your phone is ideal for the right person since it can be done with a grand total of zero cost or risk. You don’t need a stylus, and honestly, the versatility of Sketchbook on my phone made me comfortable enough to just use my hands. The brushes and intuitive design made it so easy to start from scratch. Even though the screen is small, I’m going to continue to practice with it because I had such a good experience.

If you’re still wondering how to begin the journey of art itself, I will always recommend the website Drawabox. It contains free lessons that cover all the steps of learning art at various stages. The lessons available are easy to follow, and really challenge you to learn the most constructive approach.

Finally, the last tip I can share with you is to not give up right away. Learning to draw is like learning a language. It takes time and practice to properly grasp it, but with dedication and a willingness to learn, you will be able to share all those ideas you’ve been cooking up in your noggin. Don’t give up!

Editors’ Recommendations

How To Hard Reset An Amazon Fire Tablet

What’s the difference between a hard reset and a factory data reset?

There are different types of resets. The most common one is a soft reset, which is a normal reboot. Then there are the hard reset and factory data reset methods.

A hard reset is an alternate method for restarting or rebooting a device. It usually involves performing a series of hardware button presses. All this does is force a restart on your device. A hard reset will not delete data, affect apps, or make any changes. This is usually done when a device is unresponsive, and you can’t turn it off the standard way.

On the other hand, a factory data reset is a process that takes your device back to factory settings. It will delete all apps, data, settings, and any files stored on the device. The tablet’s software will be left just as it would if it were new.

QUICK ANSWER

You can hard reset an Amazon Fire tablet by pressing the Power button and holding it for about 10 seconds. This will turn off the device. Press and hold the Power button for a few seconds to turn it on again.

Some Amazon Fire tablets, like the 5th through 7th generation models, will require pressing the Volume Down and Power buttons simultaneously. Similarly, press and hold them for 10-20 seconds until the device shuts off. Then press the Power button again for a few seconds to turn it back on.

JUMP TO KEY SECTIONS

How to hard reset an Amazon Fire tablet

amazon fire 7 2022 netflix

Ryan Haines / Android Authority

Hard resetting your Amazon Fire tablet is simple, but it can be a different process, depending on your device.

Hard resetting most Amazon Fire tablets:

  • Press and hold the Power button for about 10 seconds, or until the de device shuts off.
  • Press the Power button for a few seconds to turn it back on.

Hard resetting 5th to 7th generation Amazon Fire tablets:

  • Press and hold the Power and Volume Down buttons simultaneously for about 10 seconds, or until the device shuts off.
  • Press the Power button for a few seconds to turn it back on.

How to factory reset an Amazon Fire tablet

If your Amazon Fire tablet continues to have issues, it might be a simple software problem or something going rogue in the settings. Factory resets are a bit extreme, but they often fix software issues. You should also do this when you’re selling or handing the tablet off to another person.

Factory resetting your Amazon Fire tablet from the settings:

This method is for those who can actually use the Amazon Fire tablet. Those with an unresponsive one should go to the next instruction set.

  • Open the Settings app.
  • Go into Device Options.
  • Select Reset to Factory Defaults.
  • Hit Reset.
  • Let the device do its thing. It will restart, and you can set it up again.

Factory resetting your Amazon Fire tablet using the Recovery Mode:

You’ll have to dig deeper into the device’s software if it’s not responsive, and you need to perform a factory reset. This can be done from the Recovery Mode. Here’s how to do it.

  • Turn off the device. You can use the hard reset methods listed above if it’s not responsive.
  • With the device off, press and hold the Power and Volume Up buttons until the Android Recovery screen appears. It has blue and orange text, with a black background.
  • Some devices, like the 3rd generation Kindle Fire HD and 5th generation or newer Amazon Fire tablet will use the Power and Volume Down button combination.
  • Use the Volume buttons to navigate up and down, and the Power button to select.
  • Select wipe data/factory reset.
  • Confirm by selecting Yes.
  • Let the device do its thing. It will throw you back to the main menu when done.
  • Select reboot system now.
  • The device will restart, and you can set it up again.

Next: The most common Amazon Fire tablet problems and how to fix them

FAQs

Will a hard reset fix my Amazon Fire tablet issues?

Sometimes, a simple reboot is all it takes to fix an unresponsive Amazon Fire tablet. If anything, it’s worth a try. It won’t fix more serious issues, though.

What does a factory reset do to my device?

A factory reset will delete all apps, files, and settings. The software will be taken back to factory settings and left as if the device was new. You’ll have to set the device up all over again.

Can I do a factory reset and still keep my files?

No. A factory reset will wipe your device clean, and no personal data will be left after it’s performed. The only way to keep your files is by backing them up before doing the factory reset. Of course, this is not an option if the device is unresponsive.

What do I do if neither a hard reset nor a factory reset fix my device?

If none of these methods work, chances are you have a pretty severe problem going on with your Amazon Fire tablet. It’s time to reach out to Amazon, a technician, or your insurance provider, if you have one.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *